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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
. in nevada, the white vote was down because it was 19%. nevada used to be a swing state. 71% again in the state of nevada. one of the key battlegrounds. let me give you one more example. colorado. once a red state, now a purple state. latino vote, double digits and 75%. 75%. let's look over here. president wins nevada. once a swing state. wins colorado. wins new mexico. this used to be one of the classic swing states in american politics. don't even think about it anymore, right? and he's probably going to win florida. why do i circle those? i'm going to slide this little barrier. the darker the colors, the higher the latino population. nevada, colorado, new mexico, florida, you can find other places as well up into the midwt. the republicans don't solve this problem. this is a crisis for the republican party. >> it certainly is. we're going to talk more about texas in a bit because i see that orange there. what about women? i know this war on women fight, a lot of people wondered whether it would be effective, but when it actually happened -- >> in a word, yes. >> romney did not m
has to win iowa, colorado, and nevada. melissa: that's a lot. >> to do that you're 269. melissa: that is lot. >> go to house speaker john boehner and house votes. melissa: i see rove in the elevator. come on, tell me. they're like, you know, this could happen. you're like, no, no, tell me who is going to win. >> one more thing on this. i know this is a business show and you're at 7.9% unemployment. if the president does win re-election he will defy economic and political gravity. melissa: that's true. >> the stories that will be written about his ground game, in states like ohio, that he won in 2008 but did not abandon. he still paid staffers to keep the field offices open for the past four years. watch for that story. melissa: that is what, what you mean by ground game, staying there? >> that's right. melissa: hemmer, thanks so much. what an exciting night the next 24 hours. if early voting lines are any indication there will be overwhelming turnout. over 90 million people are expected to cast ballots. election firms coast to coast are brazing for potential problems by the way
's woman problem. in story county, nevada, a republican businessman who employs lots of women just got elected commissioner. the thing is he employs lots of women. it's a brothel. [ male announcer ] when these come together, and these come together, one thing you can depend on is that these will come together. delicious and wholesome. some combinations were just meant to be. tomato soup from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >>> another victory for a democrat in a close house race. ron barber, the successor to gabrielle giffords, has won his race in southern arizona. barber defeated martha mcsally. it's barber, the democrat, who has emerged victorious. he was a district director for congresswoman giffords, and he was actually injured during the shooting that nearly killed her. >>> an update from florida in that race between patrick murphy and allen west. murphy's lead over west has grown by nearly 300 votes after a recount in st. lucy county, but west is still, unbelievably, refusing to concede. we'll be right back. [ male anno] you are a business pro. monarch of marketing ana
that woman in -- i forget her name -- in nevada who was really tough -- sharron angle. do you think they're saying it the wrong way when they're speaking conservative language or they're saying something wrong? >> well, you know -- >> which is it? >> todd akin was never a tea party candidate. that's important. there were two other primary challengers who were the favorite of the tea party who focused on fiscal db. >> were they to his right? >> they were focused on economic issues. he was always from the social conservative wing of the party, but a big fan of earmarks. even claire mccaskill discovered she was againstary marks. democrats ran on what i would call tea party issues but there is no tea party. there is a set of issues that define the tea party movement and you had both republicans and democrats successfully running against earmarks, distancing themselves from obama care, running for balanced budget. >> you say it's fiscal issues but below the surface you hear a lot of concern about illegal immigration, anger about it from tea party people. it's not all numbers. >> it's not -- t
part of the strategy. ogle, nevada, ohio, like a couple percentage points that makes a difference. the people that are less likely voters but there are always moments and there are moments during the campaign where you think -- >> how bad after that first debate? >> i'm surprised that's what you brought up. [laughter] >> the first debate as someone that's worked on and off for about six years and i was there the whole time from beginning to end in 2007, 2008 the first was very important for us and it's probably a defining point for us and it reminded a lot of loss of when we lost the new hampshire primary in 2008. when you kind of thing we are in a good place and then you think hold on. the first debate going into, you don't know how you are going to do. no one knows. you can talk to everyone who's been a part of its but we didn't know how it was going to go. afterwards we didn't actually think it was as bad as everybody else did and we all went out on tv and talk to everybody in the was only until a day or so later. >> but you had seen twitter which was melting. >> twitter was me
: but in the end, it was not even close. obama won even those outstanding battlegrounds, like virginia, nevada. >> i just spoke with governor romney. and we may have battled fiercely. but it's only because we love this country deeply. >> reporter: so, george, the question, now, what now? and president obama has said that he will reach out to republican leaders. he wants to meet with mitt romney. he even last night reached out to romney voters. where are some areas of compromise? perhaps tax reform. perhaps immigration reform. we'll see in the days ahead. george? >> that's right. that's going start right away. jake tapper, thank you very much. >>> as you mentioned, it was a very different scene in boston last night. you could see the shock and sadness on the faces of governor romney's supporters. he made his own gracious speech. david muir has been covering governor romney from the start. boy, you looked at the faces last night, david. you saw his campaign team. they really believed in their theory of the case. they thought they could win this. >> reporter: yeah. no question, george. in fact, t
a telephone call with a lot of people in nevada. we were talking about challenges there and their home values are down and people are having a hard time making ends meet. the median income in america has dropped over $4,000 in the last four years. they are earning less than four years ago. the same time cost of gasoline has gone up $2,000 a family, health insurance premiums are up, groceries are up. these are tough times for america. so my plan to create 12 million jobs is needed and needed now. it has five parts which number one we're going to take full advantage of our energy, our oil, our coal, our gas. [applause] . and that creates a lot of jobs. not just in the energy sector but in places that use energy, manufacturing for instance uses a lot of energy in many cases and by having low cost energy and we have it and will continue to have it if we take advantage of these resources. you're going to see manufacturing come back to this country. this is big for our country. that's number one. number two, it's a very helpful thing if a nation has the most productivty in the world and we do. i us
of voters has increased in colorado, iowa, minnesota, nevada, north carolina, and wisconsin. it looks like it decreased in 35 of 49 battleground states. the total turnout may be higher in 2008 when all the votes are finally counted. as we plan 4, total minority vote share increased to 28%. our coalition turnout, women made up about the same% of the electorate as in 2008. we got if you got% of women voters. for lots of reporting about youth turnout, they continue to turn out and take control of their future. in virginia, we increased our youth percentage. in florida, boating rates increased to 16%, and we got 61% in 2008 and 66% in 2012. african american turnout and support was as high or higher than ever. in ohio, african-americans increased from 11% to 15%. we got somewhere between 9% and 97% in every battle ground state. 71% of latino vote, the highest percentage of latino vote since 1996. in florida increase from 14% in 2008 to 17% in 2012. we increased our vote share in florida from 57 to 60, which appears to be a high mark for any democratic candidate. for the first time since the rev
. hispanics are a small slice, but a growing slice in virginia. this is not colorado or nevada or mexico. nonetheless, hispanics in virginia, as in many of the other states, to be very heavily democratic. and so, to the extent they turn out, even if they are only 4% of the statewide votes in any given year, they can assist democrats. let me mention asian americans, because they have become increasingly important in virginia, even though they are a small percentage of the population and the registered population. in northern virginia in particular, they have become exceptionally active. they give a lot of money to candidates. they are predominantly democratic, although slices of the asian-american population, such as vietnamese americans, will support republicans. it goes to show that in a diverse population, virginia has become tremendously diverse. when i was growing up, the white turnout on election day was about 85% of the total. as i mentioned, it's low 70's today. that makes a giant difference. you can tell it in the election results. even a small slice of the population can have a
know, nevada went obama and then missouri and then it was the final projection because of ohio, right? >> because of ohio. missouri went for governor romney. as you watched early on, you knew coming in that governor romney had a harder path to 270. you knew he needed this. we haven't called that yet. the president is leading now. it is blue on this map because that is the vote total. you knew he needed this, he needed virginia and ohio and somewhere else. as we watched the vote results come in, we could start here in ohio, a point early on, if you look at this, look at the map, you say look at all that red, the republican had to win. but you look up here and you asked me earlier about surprises, one of the surprises was it came in, where it came into play, was the obama campaign did exactly what it said it would do. without a primary challenge, it spent months and millions saying let's find all these african-american voters in cuyahoga county, key place in cleveland, have their names, their contacts, turn them out and they did. 69 to 30. running for re-election as an incumbent in a ba
for fundraisers in that year. what are we doing when we have the president running around? as i recall the nevada event after libya was a fundraiser. this is the fourth of his time in office is this election year and a spinning in a fundraisers. romney skeen skeen videotaped it is fundraisers talking about the 47% in a private room with people that's what they want to hear. that's who he's meeting with all the time. so this is a problem for both sides and were going to see the pressure in the house and senate races. >> we only have a minute left, but it does to hear if there is an action of some sort taken to compel disclosure or the higher degree of independence for whatever measures the face. the vision of the future two, three, four cyclists on the road butter politics is going to look like. you were describing a minute ago the growth of the party structure composed of these sorts of organizations of the old structure commotions already withering away come in ap completely deteriorated or what you think running a campaign would be by? >> crossroads is a perfect republican party, doing a lot of
states, california, nevada and florida, have already made self-driving vehicles legal as long as the human's sitting in the driver's seat in case of a emergency. that's a good idea. meanwhile, these cars could lose worker productivity. the average commuter spends 250 hours a year behind the wheel. or they could come in handy after you've had a couple cocktails. self-driving trucks could transform the trucking industry. picture long lines of self-driving 18-wheelers traveling down the highway just a few inches apart, no drivers, no stops for gas or food, it could boost fuel efficiency as much as 20%. we're going to need to keep driving ourselves though for a while longer. experts say the driverless cars should be more common in another ten to 15 years when the costs come down. here's the question, how would you feel about riding in a car that drives itself? go to cnn.com/caffertyfile, post a comment on my blog. or go to our post on the "the situation room" facebook page. i don't know if i'd trust a car to drive itself. >> me either. i wouldn't feel good about it at all, jack. n
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)